Catching Shad
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Posted on Friday Jul 12, 2013 at 3:04 PM  
Does anyone use their sonar on a lake to catch shad or is the best way just to watch for them flicking the surface. I was on Keystone this morning and marked a lot of shad with my locator but was unable to net them. They were at about 10 feet in 30 feet of water. Do they scedaddle when they hear the net hit the water?
Posted on Friday Jul 12, 2013 at 8:30 PM  
I think most do both depending on time of year. I put a locator on the front of my boat so I could be exactly over them in the winter when they seem to be deeper. Most of the time regardless of time of year I will always look for them flipping. They will scatter when you throw net but if it was a decent size school you should of gotten some. but that would depend on size of net also.
I don't believe in Miracles, I rely on them.
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Posted on Saturday Jul 13, 2013 at 4:06 PM  
When you are on the Verdigris, old ox bows like at Rogers Point seem to be the prime spots. However, are there places on the main channel that also hold shad? The shad I've been catching in the really shallow backwaters don't seem to be real "frisky."
Posted on Sunday Jul 14, 2013 at 1:23 AM  
I was at Rogers Point today and couldn't find hardly any at the Port entrance, or up Bird Creek tributary. My sonar showed some good activity on the edges of the Verdigris, in 12 fow. But I forgot to use the side imaging / structure scan to see if there were limbs where I was casting. My very first cast into Verdigris was over a huge sunken limb. Cast net broke off. End of bait catching for the day (UGH!).
The more you practice, the luckier you get.
Posted on Sunday Jul 14, 2013 at 8:23 AM  
Sorry about your cast net! Were there any up in the ox bow or was that your backup plan before you lost your net?
Posted on Sunday Jul 14, 2013 at 8:30 AM  
Didn't go up the ox bow at the launch ramp because I was told that few are in there, plus the water's getting really, really thin in the launch area. Is that the ox bow you are talking of?
The more you practice, the luckier you get.
Posted on Sunday Jul 14, 2013 at 7:19 PM  
Yes. The water was really low about week ago and getting really warm but there were a lot of shad to the west near one of the old loading docks. However, most were really small and they weren't in the best shape.
Posted on Monday Jul 22, 2013 at 8:52 PM  
TMJ - I was wrong. There's allot of nice shad up into the oxbow. The best practice that I found was to start across from the rowing dock, come out to at least 2 to 3 ft of water and head slowly toward the back, kind of criss crossing, left to right and right to left, and to toss on the edge of structure. The key for me was not to throw in less than 2ft of water. And, the further back I went, I would use the trolling motor sonar while going back and forth, and throw when I crossed the deepest part. That seemed to me when I got the biggest shad in the net. And it also seemed like when I got around that abandoned loading dock, the shad were larger. By the time I got to the bridge, 2ft was the deepest water. And I ran aground about 50 yards from the bridge pylons. It kind of brings a question to my mind - what the heck is that abandoned loading dock doing there? Did they really bring barges into that oxbow to load? That seems hard to believe.
The more you practice, the luckier you get.
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