Homemade Salsa Recipe??
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Posted on Friday Jun 15, 2012 at 10:15 AM  
any one have a good one??
Posted on Friday Jun 15, 2012 at 11:17 AM  
Looking forward to this Great idea Shawn!
Posted on Friday Jun 15, 2012 at 11:40 AM  
Posted on Friday Jun 15, 2012 at 7:00 PM  
Let me get done with dinner.

You know not what you ask.
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Posted on Friday Jun 15, 2012 at 7:16 PM  
I've made this many times. Tasty! Although, it is green, not red.

Salsa Verde Cruda
Essential Roasted Tomatillo Serrano Sauce
Yields: ~ 2 ½ c
From: Rick Bayless’s Mexican Kitchen

1# (10 - 12 medium) tomatillos, husked and rinsed
Fresh Serrano chiles to taste (roughly 5, ~ 1 oz total)
2 large garlic cloves, unpeeled
1 small (4 oz) white onion, finely chopped
¼ c loosely packed, roughly chopped cilantro
Salt, ~ 1 generous t
Sugar, ~ 1 scant t (if needed)

Lay the tomatillos on a baking sheet and place 4” below a very hot broiler. When the tomatillos blister, blacken, and soften on one side, about 5 minutes, turn them over and roast the other side. Cool completely on the baking sheet.
Roast chiles and garlic on an ungreased skillet over medium heat, turning occasionally, until blackened in spots and soft, 5 - 10 minutes for the chiles, about 15 minutes for the garlic. Cool, then pull the stems from the chiles and peel the garlic.
Scrape the roasted tomatillos (and any juices that have accumulated around them) into a food processor or blender, along with the roasted chiles and garlic. Pulse the machine until everything is reduced to a rather coarse-textured puree - the unctuously soft tomatillos will provide the body for all the chunky bits of chiles and garlic
Scrape the salsa into a serving bowl, then stir in between ¼ and ½ c water, to give the sauce a easily spoon able consistency. Scoop the onion into a strainer, rinse under cold water, shake off the excess and stir into the salsa, along with the cilantro. Taste and season with salt and a little sugar.

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Posted on Friday Jun 15, 2012 at 7:17 PM  
I really need to try this one.

Salsa Negra
Essential Sweet and Smoky Chipotle Seasoning Salsa
Yields: ~ 1 ¼ c potent salsa
From: Rick Bayless’s Mexican Kitchen

2 ½ oz (roughly 2 ½ small cones) piloncillo (Mexican unrefined sugar)
-or- 1/3 c brown sugar + 2 T molasses
Vegetable oil to a depth of ¼”, for frying
4 oz (~ 50) dried chipotle chiles (preferably the cranberry-red colorados), stemmed
3 garlic cloves
Salt, ~ ½ t

Into a medium-sized saucepan, measure 1 ¼ c water, add the piloncillo (or brown sugar and molasses), bring to a boil, remove from the heat and stir until the sugar is dissolved.
Set a medium-size ( 8 - 9”) skillet of oil over medium heat. When the oil is hot but not smoking, add half the chiles. Stir as they toast to a spicy smelling, mahogany brown, about 2 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to scoop them out, leaving as much oil as possible behind, then drop them into the sweet water. Treat the remaining chiles the same way.
Pour off all but a thin coating of oil in the skillet and return to medium heat. Add the garlic cloves and cook, stirring regularly, until golden, 4 minutes. Add to the chiles. Pour the chile mixture, water and all, into a blender or food processor, and whir into a smooth puree.
Return the well-oiled skillet to medium-high heat. When hot, add the chile puree all at once. Stir for a minute, scraping up anything that sticks to the bottom of the skillet, then reduce the heat to medium-low and cook for about 20 minutes, stirring frequently, until the salsa is as thick as tomato paste. (It will be very spicy smelling and will have darkened nearly to black. If you’ve left a nice coating of oil in the skillet, it’ll be shiny on top when perfectly reduced.) Taste gingerly and season with salt.
If you’re planning to use the salsa as a condiment on the table for each of your guests to spoon on or stir in, you’ll probably want to stir in a little water to give it a more saucy consistency. For use as a seasoning, you can simply scrape it into a glass jar, store in the refrigerator and dole it out a tablespoon or so at a time.

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Posted on Friday Jun 15, 2012 at 7:17 PM  
A classic, red, salsa:

Salsa Mexicana Clásica
Essential Chopped Tomato Serrano Sauce
Yields: ~ 2 c
From: Rick Bayless’s Mexican Kitchen

12 oz (2 medium-small round or 4 - 5 plum) ripe tomatoes
Fresh Serrano chiles to taste (roughly 3 - 5, ½ - 1 oz total, or even more if you like it really picante)
A dozen or so large sprigs of cilantro
1 large garlic clove, peeled and very finely chopped, optional
1 small (4 oz) white onion
1 ½ t fresh lime juice
Salt, ~ ¾ t

Core the tomatoes, then cut them in half widthwise (across the “equator, if you will) and squeeze out the seeds if you wish (it will give the sauce a less rustic appearance). Finely dice the flesh by slicing it into roughly ¼” thick pieces, then cutting each slice into small dice. Scoop into a bowl.
Cut the chiles in half lengthwise (wear gloves if you hands are sensitive to their piquancy) and scrape out the seeds if you wish (not only will this make the salsa seem less rustic, but it will make it a little less picante). Chop the chiles as finely as you can, then add them to the tomatoes. Carefully bunch up the cilantro springs, and with a sharp knife, slice them 1/16” thick, stems and all, working from the leafy end to the stems. Scoop into the tomato mixture along with the optional garlic. Next, finely dice the onion with a knife, scoop it into a small strainer, then rinse it under cold water. Shake to remove excess water and add to the tomato mixture. Taste and season with lime juice and salt, and let stand few minutes for the flavors to meld.

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Posted on Friday Jun 15, 2012 at 7:19 PM  
This one is cooked, and has tomatoes and jalapenos:

Salsa de Jitomate Cocida
Essential Simmered Tomato Jalapeño Sauce
Yields: 4 c
From: Rick Bayless’s Mexican Kitchen

A generous 1# tomatoes, ~ 2 large round, 8 - 10 plum
1 - 2 (~ ¾ oz total) fresh jalapeño chiles, stemmed
1 T vegetable oil
-or- lard
½ small (~ 2 oz) white onion, thinly sliced
1 ½ c chicken broth
Salt, ~ 1 ½ t, depending on the broth

Roast the tomatoes and chiles on a baking sheet 4” below a very hot broiler until blistered and blackened on one side, about 6 minutes, then use tongs or a spoon to turn them over and roast the other side. Cool, then peel the tomatoes, collecting all the juices. Roughly chop the chiles. Coarsely puree the tomatoes, with juices, and the chiles in a food processor or blender. Pulse the mixture only a few times leaving it quite chunky for huevos rancheros, for instance, or run the machine until the sauce is quite smooth if you’re prepping, say, enchiladas.
In a medium deep, heavy skillet or medium sized saucepan heat the oil or lard over medium heat. Add the onion and fry until browned, about 10 minutes. Increase the heat to medium-high, and, when very hot, add the tomato-chile mixture. Stir for 5 minutes or so as the mixture sizzles, darkens, and thickens, then reduce the heat to medium-low, stir in the broth and let the sauce cook at a gentle simmer for about 15 minutes, until beginning to thicken (although it shouldn’t be as thick as spaghetti sauce). Taste and season with salt and it’s ready to use.

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Posted on Friday Jun 15, 2012 at 7:30 PM  
This one is from me personally:

Take a few habanero chiles, and roast them on a grill, or skewered on a fork and over a gas flame (I prefer the wood fire, myself). Allow the chiles to cool. While this cools, dice half of a red onion, maybe less. Peel, core, and dice half of a FRESH pineapple. Canned pineapple is NOT acceptable, as you loose most of the sugar in the canning process. That sugar will help balance the heat of the chiles. Finely minced about half a bunch of cilantro. Mix together the onion, pineapple, and cilantro.

Now comes the fun part. Put on a pair of latex gloves. Carefully cut the peppers open, and remove the seeds and pith (this is where the bulk of the heat is). Dispose of the seeds and pith. Carefully mince the peppers and add them to the mixture. Dispose of the gloves.

Do not, REPEAT, DO NOT touch your face, eyes, mouth, or any part of your skin while you are working with the peppers. Don't even go pee (trust me on this one). Wash your hands, cutting board, and knife thoroughly with lots of hot, soapy water.

Squeeze the juice of one lime over the salsa, and stir together well.

This salsa is more from the Yucatan, than Sonora. This salsa is EXTREMELY potent. It is commonly paired with fish, especially fish that's been steamed, wrapped in banana leaves.

Hmmm....I may have to post a banana-wrapped steamed fish recipe now.
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Posted on Monday Jun 18, 2012 at 4:16 PM  
Thanks Allen!! I dont know whats up with theses other jokers... lol
Posted on Wednesday Jul 11, 2012 at 9:13 PM  
Sounds good,this makes me miss good ole roasted pueblo chilies made into green chilie man that stuff is good,makes me mad i cant get get good mexican Food in okc.Thanks For Sharing
Posted on Wednesday Jul 11, 2012 at 10:45 PM  
I just made a batch of Green Chile Stew for dinner tonight. Yummy!!!
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Posted on Friday Jul 13, 2012 at 5:24 AM  
Green chilie stew huh? Sounds good ..Punch these words into google..Pueblo Food Network Slopper challenge..I used to live in Pueblo. When i visit im going make myself sick with mexican Food
Posted on Friday Jul 13, 2012 at 5:30 AM  
[quote]Originally posted by JustFishing82

Green chilie stew huh? Sounds good ..Punch these words into google..Pueblo Food Network Slopper challenge..I used to live in Pueblo. When i visit im going make myself sick with mexican Food

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h49_G5JWejc&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Saved you the trouble/Enjoy
Posted on Friday Jul 13, 2012 at 6:25 PM  
That looked good!!!

Back in '92, I spent the summer working at Philmont Scout Ranch, in the kitchen. I ran up to Texas Red's Steakhouse in Red River a couple times, not to mention Taos. We had a bunch of locals working in the kitchen as well, and they would occasionally "treat" us to some home cooking.
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Posted on Friday Jul 13, 2012 at 6:46 PM  
I once asked a waitress at a mexican restaurant if they had anything but beans and rice to go with their entrees. She said they always serve beans and rice to round out the meal, if you want real mexican food home cooking you have to come to our house.
Posted on Friday Jul 13, 2012 at 8:58 PM  
Allen,its to real good!
Posted on Friday Jul 13, 2012 at 8:59 PM  
Allen,its real good
Posted on Monday Aug 20, 2012 at 2:47 PM  
Quick and easy

Buy 3 cans of mexican recepie stewed tomatoes (del monte)

3-4 jalapenos or habaneros if you are adventureous

Cilantro bunch

Finely chopped Red onions or not(depends on your tastes)

Garlic salt(to taste)

Salt to taste

white vinegar (couple of tablespoons or substitute lime juice)

In a food processor, DRAIN the juice from cans of Stewed tomatoes into processor, add vinegar, salt,garlic, peppers and cilantro - chop setting till peppers are well blended with cilantro (sauce will be green) add drained stewed tomatoes and just bump on processor till you get chopped consistency you like

This is a good dipping sauce or put on food sauce

This is a basic red sauce - add what you like, we also put in chunks of guacamole if we use habaneros as peppers --
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